Saksa et al., 2013

Talk/Poster

Impacts of forest thinning and climate change on transpiration and runoff rates in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer headwater catchments.

Saksa, P.C., R.L. Ray, R.C. Bales, and M.H. Conklin. (2013)
American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2013, abstract #GC11B-0990  

Abstract

Using a spatially explicit hydro-ecological model, impacts from forest thinning and climate change on snowpack, evapotranspiration (ET) rates, soil moisture storage, and runoff were investigated in Sierra Nevada headwater catchments spanning elevations of 1,500 to 2,000-m. Along this elevation gradient, precipitation changes from rain-dominated to snow-dominated, so precipitation phase will be strongly impacted by increases in temperature. Mixed-conifer forests in the Sierra Nevada near the 2,000-m elevation band also transpire at a high rate relative to upper elevation forests that are more restricted by colder winter temperatures and lower elevation forests that are more restricted by lower summer soil moisture, increasing the potential of reduced transpiration with vegetation thinning. Forest treatment and climate change scenarios were modeled using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys), calibrated with two years of snow, soil moisture, and streamflow observations. Simulations of forest thinning at moderate (66% of current vegetation density) and restoration (33% density) levels were combined with precipitation changes up to 20% and temperature increases up to 6οC for projecting impacts on ET and runoff rates. Model results indicated that moderate thinning alone could increase runoff by 3%, but additional temperature increases of 2-4οC could increase runoff rates another 6% - similar to a restoration level thinning. Modifying temperature and precipitation separately showed that the two methods of climate forcing both led to fluctuations in soil moisture, caused by changes in precipitation phase (snow/rain) and final day of snowpack melt. The snowmelt timing affected runoff rates by causing changes in the spring soil moisture recession, and showed that it may be one of the critical processes that affects annual runoff rates, not just runoff timing. Simulations of precipitation and temperature changes together showed that precipitation would be the main driver of runoff change in the current vegetation and restoration thinning scenarios, while both precipitation and temperature would drive runoff rates in a moderate thinning scenario. Ultimately, the forest thinning scenarios directly led to decreases in evapotranspiration and increases in runoff as expected, with a warmer climate potentially enhancing these changes.

Citation

Saksa, P.C., R.L. Ray, R.C. Bales, and M.H. Conklin. (2013): Impacts of forest thinning and climate change on transpiration and runoff rates in Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer headwater catchments . American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2013, abstract #GC11B-0990.

This Paper/Book acknowledges NSF CZO grant support.