Kerkez et al., 2010

Talk/Poster

Design and development of a wireless sensor network to monitor snow depth in multiple catchments in the American River basin, California: hardware selection and sensor placement techniques.

Kerkez, B., Rice, R., Glaser, S.D., Bales, R.C., Saksa, P.C. (2010)
Fall meeting, American Geophysical Union, December 2010. Abstract IN34A-07.  

Abstract

A 100-node wireless sensor network (WSN) was designed for the purpose of monitoring snow depth in two watersheds, spanning 3 km2 in the American River basin, in the central Sierra Nevada of California. The network will be deployed as a prototype project that will become a core element of a larger water information system for the Sierra Nevada. The site conditions range from mid-elevation forested areas to sub-alpine terrain with light forest cover. Extreme temperature and humidity fluctuations, along with heavy rain and snowfall events, create particularly challenging conditions for wireless communications. We show how statistics gathered from a previously deployed 60-node WSN, located in the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, were used to inform design. We adapted robust network hardware, manufactured by Dust Networks for highly demanding industrial monitoring, and added linear amplifiers to the radios to improve transmission distances. We also designed a custom data-logging board to interface the WSN hardware with snow-depth sensors. Due to the large distance between sensing locations, and complexity of terrain, we analyzed network statistics to select the location of repeater nodes, to create a redundant and reliable mesh. This optimized network topology will maximize transmission distances, while ensuring power-efficient network operations throughout harsh winter conditions. At least 30 of the 100 nodes will actively sense snow depth, while the remainder will act as sensor-ready repeaters in the mesh. Data from a previously conducted snow survey was used to create a Gaussian Process model of snow depth; variance estimates produced by this model were used to suggest near-optimal locations for snow-depth sensors to measure the variability across a 1 km2 grid. We compare the locations selected by the sensor placement algorithm to those made through expert opinion, and offer explanations for differences resulting from each approach.

Citation

Kerkez, B., Rice, R., Glaser, S.D., Bales, R.C., Saksa, P.C. (2010): Design and development of a wireless sensor network to monitor snow depth in multiple catchments in the American River basin, California: hardware selection and sensor placement techniques. Fall meeting, American Geophysical Union, December 2010. Abstract IN34A-07..