Hajji et al., 2018

Paper/Book

Application of the maximum entropy production model of evapotranspiration over partially vegetated water-limited land surfaces

Hajji, I., D. F. Nadeau, B. Music, F. Anctil, and J. Wang (2018)
Journal of Hydrometeorology 19: 989-1005  

Abstract

The maximum entropy production (MEP) model based on nonequilibrium thermodynamics and the theory of Bayesian probabilities was recently developed to model land surface fluxes, including soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration. This model requires few input data and ensures the closure of the surface energy balance. This study aims to test the capability of such a model to realistically simulate evapotranspiration (ET) over a wide range of climates and vegetation covers. A weighting coefficient is introduced to calculate total ET from soil evaporation and vegetation transpiration over partially vegetated land surfaces, resulting in the MEP-ET model. Using this coefficient, the model outputs are compared with in situ observations of ET at eight FLUXNET sites across the continental United States. Results confirm the close agreement between the MEP-ET predicted daily ET and the corresponding observations at sites characterized by moderately limited water availability. Poor ET results were obtained under high water stress conditions. A regulation parameter was therefore introduced in the MEP-ET model to properly take into account the effects of soil water stress on stomata, yielding the generalized MEP-ET model. This parameter considerably reduced model biases under water stress conditions for various heterogeneous land surface sites. The generalized MEP-ET model outperforms several popular ET models, including Penman–Monteith (PM), modified Priestley–Taylor–Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), and air-relative-humidity-based two-source model (ARTS) at all test sites.

Citation

Hajji, I., D. F. Nadeau, B. Music, F. Anctil, and J. Wang (2018): Application of the maximum entropy production model of evapotranspiration over partially vegetated water-limited land surfaces. Journal of Hydrometeorology 19: 989-1005. DOI: 10.1175/JHM-D-17-0133.1

This Paper/Book acknowledges NSF CZO grant support.