Brantley et al., 2016

Report/Proposal

Using the Susquehanna - Shale Hills CZO to Project from the Geological Past to the Anthropocene Future

Brantley, Susan L., Davis, Kenneth J., Eissenstat, David M., Li, Li, Russo, Tess (2016)
NSF Award # 1331726 - Annual Report: Year 3  

Abstract

We are learning to earthcast the CZ (develop quantitative models for earth surface evolution). We focus on a 165 km2 watershed in central PA and have developed an observational model to measure important aspects of the CZ in this large watershed. Over short timescales and large spatial extents, we are developing an atmosphere-land surface model that couples meteorological and ecological processes with hydrological and biogeochemical processes in regolith using information about i) depth to bedrock; ii) permeability; iii) water uptake by roots; iv) distribution of fractures and macropores. Over long timescales and smaller spatial extents, we are developing models that predict these regolith characteristics. The models that treat these various processes are built on the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM). With different modules in PIHM we plan to model changes in water, energy, sediment, and solute (WESS) fluxes at various timescales. For the sedimentary rocks underlying our CZO, we use these models to explore how the geological past has impacted the structure of regolith, and, in turn, how this structure contributes toward controlling today’s fluxes.

Citation

Brantley, Susan L., Davis, Kenneth J., Eissenstat, David M., Li, Li, Russo, Tess (2016): Using the Susquehanna - Shale Hills CZO to Project from the Geological Past to the Anthropocene Future. NSF Award # 1331726 - Annual Report: Year 3.

This Paper/Book acknowledges NSF CZO grant support.


Associated Files

Annual Report - Year 3
(255 KB pdf)