TeenShale students from State College Area High School measuring dischange and collecting water samples at Black Moshannon State Park

Map courtesy of Susquehanna River Basin Commission Water Resource Portal (www.gis.srbc.net/wrp/).  Gas pads approved by rule (orange icon) or awaiting approval (yellow triangle).

TeenShale Network (TSN) is a multi-year project aimed at monitoring changes in the water quality of Black Moshannon Creek.  Participants use scientific instruments to measure stream depth, velocity and water quality indicators such as stream temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and electrical conductivity.  The creek meanders from the lake at Black Moshannon State Park to the Clearfield County line where it joins the Moshannon Creek.  Site 1, at the lake outlet, is considered a pristine monitoring site.  Site 2 and Site 3 are monitoring sites above and below an area where gas extraction from the Marcellus Shale is occurring. 

Water samples are filtered through a 0.45 micorn filter in the filed.

A quick review of the FlowTracker is provided before the students begin to measure discharge. 

Collaborations with University of Pittsburgh provide the 2015-2016 participants a hands-on opportunity to measure several water quality parameters in the classroom laboratory. 

“Not only can you gather realistic scientific data, but it’s for a cause,” said Emily Redmond, an 8th grader. “I think the experience can encourage students to learn more about fracking and its effects on the environment. It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity because I bet not many other people are doing this kind of experiment.”

“I feel like in the classroom you learn more about theory, and in the field you apply what you learned,” said Valeria Soler Pelaez, a 9th grader. “You make more connections to the real world. And I feel like this helps it stay in your brain. It helps you remember by making these connections you’ve never thought about.”

At the conclusion of the 2015-2016 academic year, this project has trained more than 80 students in water quality monitoring field techniques and data analyses of water quality samples.  This field based inquiry driven project teaches participants water quality monitoring techniques used by academics and government agencies, data analyses and visualization skills, and completes the scientific method with communication of their research in student byline news articles and scientific meetings.

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A 4th grade student at Philipsburg Elementary shows off the bean seed he grew in the dark as part of an experiment on how much light bean seeds need to grow.

    The NSF GK-12 CarbonEARTH (Educators and Researchers Together for Humanity) Fellowship program aims to unite carbon researchers with elementary and middle school educators to improve science communication and education. CarbonEARTH graduate fellows work to integrate aspects of their graduate research into the classroom and collaborate with teachers to develop inquiry-based science curriculum in subjects related to carbon, including energy, matter and materials, earth processes and ecosystems. Two SSHO CZO students are participating in the program for the 2012-2013 academic year.  Ashlee Dere is working with 4th grade teacher Laura Warner at Philipsburg Elementary School in Philipsburg, PA and Katie Gaines is working with 7th/8th grade teacher Cindy Hart at Ben Franklin School in Harrisburg, PA. 

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary hunt for worms in the playground soil to test what effect adding worms to soil will have on bean seed growth.

 

On a field trip to Shaver’s Creek, 4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary learn to identify local birds.

As an introduction to the scientific method, 4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary test how many licks it takes to get to the center of a tootsie pop.

 

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary test how they can sustainably “fish” goldfish crackers from their lake.

 

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary study earthworm behavior.

 

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary turn over a log during a field trip to Shaver’s Creek to look for organisms.

 

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary make and investigate oobleck to learn about states of matter.

  

 

A 4th grade student at Philipsburg Elementary shows off the bean seed he grew in the dark as part of an experiment on how much light bean seeds need to grow.

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary hunt for worms in the playground soil to test what effect adding worms to soil will have on bean seed growth.

As an introduction to the scientific method, 4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary test how many licks it takes to get to the center of a tootsie pop.

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary test how they can sustainably “fish” goldfish crackers from their lake.

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary study earthworm behavior.

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary make and investigate oobleck to learn about states of matter.

4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary turn over a log during a field trip to Shaver’s Creek to look for organisms.

On a field trip to Shaver’s Creek, 4th grade students at Philipsburg Elementary learn to identify local birds.

Water samples are filtered through a 0.45 micorn filter in the filed.

Map courtesy of Susquehanna River Basin Commission Water Resource Portal (www.gis.srbc.net/wrp/).  Gas pads approved by rule (orange icon) or awaiting approval (yellow triangle).

A quick review of the FlowTracker is provided before the students begin to measure discharge. 

Collaborations with University of Pittsburgh provide the 2015-2016 participants a hands-on opportunity to measure several water quality parameters in the classroom laboratory. 


Associated Files

Slices of Time (QuickTime movie)
(138 MB mov)
Media presentation of the scales at which environmental processes occur



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