An International Initiative for Science in the Critical Zone

Sites around the world with very high or low rates of precipitation or erosion could be ideal for building CZOs. A spectacular example of a site with erosional headcuts, perhaps driven by groundwater sapping in a formerly terraced hillside, is shown near Linxia Gansu, China. Credit: Eric Kirby. Published in EOS, 05 June 2015.

23 Jun 2015
News Source: Eos buzz

The results of a pre-AGU 2014 international Critical Zone workshop in San Francisco were recently published in Eos Buzz.

Image: Sites around the world with very high or low rates of precipitation or erosion could be ideal for building CZOs. A spectacular example of a site with erosional headcuts, perhaps driven by groundwater sapping in a formerly terraced hillside, is shown near Linxia Gansu, China. Credit: Eric Kirby. Published in EOS, 05 June 2015. [Click image to enlarge]

The results of a pre-AGU 2014 international Critical Zone workshop in San Francisco were recently published in Eos Buzz. The workshop was funded through the U.S. NSF's Science Across Virtual Institutes (SAVI) program and focused on developing coordinated activities. Representatives from the US, China, France, UK, and Germany attended, representing the science community as well as national funding agencies. Participants agreed that greater scientific advances could be realized by removing funding barriers for joint international research and developing new ways to share news and data. To read the newsletter article go to: https://eos.org/meeting-reports/an-international-initiative-for-science-in-the-critical-zone.


News Source:
READ MORE from Eos buzz >>

News Category:
INFRASTRUCTURE | PEOPLE


People Involved

CZO
Non-CZO

Steve Banwart - Professor, University of Sheffield


Partner Organizations


Discipline Tags and CZOs

All Disciplines

National

Explore Further

NEWS | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011