Dataset Listing

East Peak - Meteorology (2002-2016)

East Peak Climate

Variables:  Precipitation horizontal, Precipitation, Air temperature_ C, Average relative humidity, Radiation_ incoming PAR, Incoming solar radiation, Mean wind speed, Wind direction, For more infromation please visit: https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lczodata/content/east-peak-climate

Standard Variables:  Temperature|Relative humidity|Radiation, incoming|Wind speed|Precipitation|Radiation, incoming PAR|Wind direction

Date Range:  (2002-2016)

Dataset Creators/Authors:  Scatena, F.N.; Holwerda, F.

Contact:  Grizelle González, ggonzalez@fs.fed.us, Miguel Leon, leonmi@sas.upenn.edu

Field Area:   East Peak

Description
Keywords & XML
Citation
  • Description

    In the hourly file, data in red is not good or not reliable. We have connected two anemometers at different heights on the tower, causing an additional 8 columns for wind vectors and wind speed.

    Detailed information about the following major variables is available in Comments/README:
    Temperature (T),
    Radiation data, incoming solar radiation (Sin), Relative humidity (RH),
    Radiation data, photosynthetic active radiation (PAR),
    Wind speed (U),
    Wind direction (Udir),
    Rainfall (P),
    Horizontal precipitation (HP)
    Comments
    In the hourly file, data in red is not good or not reliable. We have connected two anemometers at different heights on the tower, causing an additional 8 columns for wind vectors and wind speed. Temperature (T) The hourly temperature (T) series of the East peak (EP) site were checked for quality by comparing them against the hourly T data of the lower Bisley tower (352 m a.s.l.). This comparison allowed for identifying periods during which T measurements were erroneous due to sensor drift, power failures, or any other reason. Temporary drift (caused by e.g. condensation) or spikes could be fairly well identified, and the data subject to these problems were replaced by NaN’s. Radiation data, incoming solar radiation (Sin) The values of incoming solar radiation (Sin) measured at EP have been recorded using multipliers provided by LI-COR. This is not correct, however. Although the pyranometers were manufactured by LI-COR, the sensors were bought from Campbell Scientific (CS). CS adapts the sensors to make them compatible with their data loggers. The adaptation consists of fitting the cable of the sensor with a resistor that is set to give a fixed output (or sensitivity) of 200 W m-2 mV-1 (see CS manual for the LI200X pyranometer). Hence, each sensor has a sensitivity of 200 W m-2 mV-1. Relative humidity (RH) The hourly data were first graphed and visually checked for obvious errors such as e.g. spikes (due to e.g. sensor failure or power issues) and the erroneous data were replaced by NaN’s. Radiation data, photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) The Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR) data were first visually checked for obvious errors (e.g. out of range data) and the erroneous data were replaced by NaN’s. Next, daily PAR totals as measured at the EP station and the SCF station of Whendee Silver were compared with daily totals of Sin observed at the respective stations (Figure 7b). The slopes of the linear regressions of PAR against Sin as calculated from the EP and SCF data (1.77 and 1.89, respectively) Wind speed (U) The wind speed (U) data were first visually checked for obvious errors (e.g. out of range data) and the erroneous data were replaced by NaN’s. . U measured at the EP station before July 2004 seems too low (data to the left of the vertical line). The average daily U for this period was 3.2 m s-1, which is considerably lower than the average value of 4.5 m s-1 measured after July 2004. The latter value compares well with the average values of 45 m s-1 reported for by Briscoe (1966), Baynton (1968), and Holwerda (2005). Wind direction (Udir) The wind direction (Udir) data were first visually checked for obvious errors (e.g. out of range data) and the erroneous data were replaced by NaN’s. There was fair agreement between the Udir data from the EP and SCF stations. Since measurements were made over complex terrain – where the wind direction is strongly influenced by the local topography  differences between Udir measured at different locations are to be expected. For most of the time, winds were coming from the NE. Considering only days with winds coming from between 0 and 90, the average Udir was 67  9 for EP and 55  12 for SCF. The average measured at EP (67) is close to the average value of 72  10 derived by Holwerda (2005) for the same site (using one year of data from November 2000 until October 2001). Rainfall (P) The rainfall (P) data from EP were compared with P measured at the SCF and TCF stations of Whendee Silver. Erroneous data due to e.g. a clogged funnel, or a malfunctioning reed switch or connection were replaced by NaN’s. Reference data from the SCF and TCF stations were not available for the entire period. As such, parts of the EP P series could not be validated against data (Figure 13). The EP P data showed a strong linear relationship with the P data from the SCF and TCF stations (Figure 12). Hence, gaps in the EP P data were filled using linear regression. To account for changes in the calibration coefficients, separate regression relationships were derived for each gap using data from before the gap. Horizontal precipitation (HP) The fog gauge data (HP) were screened for obvious errors due to e.g. a malfunctioning reed switch or a clogged funnel. The erroneous were replaced by NaN’s. It is likely that the much higher values of HP were caused by the use of a wrong, or different multiplier in the data logger program. The multiplier that is used normally is 0.1; dividing the ‘too high’ values by 10 yields values of daily HP that are close to those ‘normally’ observed (see Figure 15), suggesting that a multiplier of 1 was used for the data in blue. Hence, the data in blue were corrected by dividing by 10 . From 29 October 2009 onwards, the ‘Wire harp’ fog gauge was replaced by a ‘Modified Juvik’ gauge.
  • Keywords

    Meteorlogy

    XML Metadata

    criticalzone.org/national/data/xml-metadata-test/2619/

    XML is in ISO-19115 geographic metadata format, compatible with ESRI Geoportal Server.

  • Citation for This Dataset

    Scatena, F.N., Holwerda, F. East Peak Climate. 2013. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/lczodata/content/east-peak-climate

    Citation for This Webpage

    Scatena, F.N.; Holwerda, F. (2016). "CZO Dataset: East Peak - Meteorology (2002-2016)." Retrieved 13 Oct 2019, from http://criticalzone.org/national/data/dataset/2619/

Data

East Peak - hourly 1/1/2002 to 1/1/2010

(.csv)   Data Level 0,  Metadata

East Peak - daily 2002 to 2010

(.csv)   Data Level 0,  Metadata

East Peak - IITF East Peak Daily Climate 4-9-2010 to 11-4-2010

(.csv)   Data Level 0,  Metadata

East Peak - IITF East Peak Climate hourly 2010 to 10-24-2016

(xlsx)   Data Level 0,  Metadata,  [Private]

East Peak - IITF East Peak Daily Climate 12-11-2010 to 10-24-2016

(xlsx)   Data Level 0,  Metadata

Data Use Policy
Data Sharing Policy
  • Data Use Policy

    DRAFT v.0.4.0

    1. Use our data freely. All CZO Data Products* except those labelled Private** are released to the public and may be freely copied, distributed, edited, remixed, and built upon under the condition that you give acknowledgement as described below. Non-CZO data products — like those produced by USGS or NOAA — have their own use policies, which should be followed.

    2. Give proper citation and acknowledgement. Publications, models and data products that make use of these datasets must include proper citation and acknowledgement. Most importantly, provide a citation in a similar way as a journal article (i.e. author, title, year of publication, name of CZO “publisher”, edition or version, and URL or DOI access information. See http://www.datacite.org/whycitedata). Also include at least a brief acknowledgement such as: “Data were provided by the NSF-supported Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory” (replace with the appropriate observatory name).

    3. Let us know how you will use the data. The dataset creators would appreciate hearing of any plans to use the dataset. Consider consultation or collaboration with dataset creators.

    *CZO Data Products.  Defined as a data collected with any monetary or logistical support from a CZO.

    **Private. Most private data will be released to the public within 1-2 years, with some exceptionally challenging datasets up to 4 years. To inquire about potential earlier use, please contact us.

  • Data Sharing Policy

    DRAFT v.0.2.5

    All CZO investigators and collaborators who receive material or logistical support from a CZO agree to:

    1. Share data privately within 1 year. CZO investigators and collaborators agree to provide CZO Data Products* — including data files and metadata for raw, quality controlled and/or derived data — to CZO data managers within one year of collection of samples, in situ or experimental data. By default, data values will be held in a Private CZO Repository**, but metadata will be made public and will provide full attribution to the Dataset Creators†.

    2. Release data to public within 2 years. CZO Dataset Creators will be encouraged after one year to release data for public access. Dataset Creators may chose to publish or release data sooner.

    3. Request, in writing, data privacy up to 4 years. CZO PIs will review short written applications to extend data privacy beyond 2 years and up to 4 years from time of collection. Extensions beyond 3 years should not be the norm, and will be granted only for compelling cases.

    4. Consult with creators of private CZO datasets prior to use. In order to enable the collaborative vision of the CZO program, data in private CZO repositories will be available to other investigators and collaborators within that CZO. Releasing or publishing any derivative of such private data without explicit consent from the dataset creators will be considered a serious scientific ethics violation.

    * CZO Data Products. Defined as data collected with any monetary or logistical support from a CZO. Logistical support includes the use of any CZO sensors, sampling infrastructure, equipment, vehicles, or labor from a supported investigator, student or staff person. CZO Data Products can acknowledge multiple additional sources of support.

    ** Private CZO Repository. Defined as a password-protected directory on each CZO’s data server. Files will be accessible by all investigators and collaborators within the given CZO and logins will be maintained by that local CZO’s data managers. Although data values will not be accessible by the public or ingested into any central data system (i.e. CUAHSI HIS), metadata will be fully discoverable by the public. This provides the dual benefit of giving attribution and credit to dataset creators and the CZO in general, while maintaining protection of intellectual property while publications are pending.

    † Dataset Creators. Defined as the people who are responsible for designing, collecting, analyzing and providing quality assurance for a dataset. The creators of a dataset are analogous to the authors of a publication, and datasets should be cited in an analogous manner following the emerging international guidelines described at http://www.datacite.org/whycitedata.


CZO Field Areas