Wetherbee et al., 2019

Paper/Book

Inorganic nitrogen wet deposition gradients in the Denver-Boulder metropolitan area and Colorado Front Range – Preliminary implications for Rocky Mountain National Park and interpolated deposition maps

Wetherbee, G., Benedict, K., Murphy, S., Elliott, E. (2019)
Science of the Total Environment 691 (2019) 1027–1042  

Abstract

For the first time in the 40-year history of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN), a unique urban-to-rural transect of wet deposition monitoring stations was operated as part of the NTN in 2017 to quantify reactive inorganic nitrogenwet deposition for adjacent urban and rural,montane regions. The transect of NADP stations (sites) was used to collect continuous precipitation depth andweekly wet-deposition samples in the Denver – Boulder, Colorado, urban corridor. Gradients in reactive inorganic nitrogen (Nr) concentrations and wet deposition were identified along the transect, which included RockyMountain National Park. Back trajectory modeling and stable isotopes suggested contribution of agricultural ammonia (NH3) to urban Nr wet deposition in Denver, but apportionment of wet-deposited Nr to agricultural versus urban mobile sources was not possible for this study. The results demonstrate the importance of multiple monitoring sites across an urban area in defining fine-scale geographic patterns in atmospheric deposition and its sources. Data from new sites located within 50 km of the urban area demonstrate that the urban influence does not extend as far as the inverse distance weighting would have suggested without such empirical monitoring data. It is important to determine the radius of influence of urban emissions and associated deposition on the interpolated deposition raster, which is constrained by a paucity of monitoring sites east of Denver. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Citation

Wetherbee, G., Benedict, K., Murphy, S., Elliott, E. (2019): Inorganic nitrogen wet deposition gradients in the Denver-Boulder metropolitan area and Colorado Front Range – Preliminary implications for Rocky Mountain National Park and interpolated deposition maps. Science of the Total Environment 691 (2019) 1027–1042.

This Paper/Book acknowledges NSF CZO grant support.